In Memory

Many of the horses who enter the CHANGE Program have withstood years of abuse and neglect. These horses seem to have a deep appreciation for the love and good care they receive, even if it's just for a short time. Despite extensive rehabilitative efforts, some cannot be saved. These are their stories.

Warning: graphic images

 

Americo

Americo
This beautiful registered 15-year old Peruvian Paso stallion was surrendered to SCACC on March 4, 2013 as part of a larger humane case. He went into CHANGE foster care for training and socialization.

Athena

Athena
Athena was a stunning 18-year-old Quarter horse/Arabian mare who spent her entire life in squalor at the hands of a Penngrove animal hoarder.
Her eyes were severely damaged by uveitis and glaucoma, chronic conditions that can be sometimes be managed with veterinary care. Untreated, these diseases caused Athena to become blind and left her in constant pain.

Blackie

Blackie
A black Quarter Horse gelding of unknown age, Blackie was found tied to a fence post on a 100-degree day. He was severely dehydrated and emaciated. A few days after his rescue, Blackie succumbed to medical complications and was euthanized.

Blaze

Blaze
On a hot summer day in 2012, the Sonoma County Animal Services Department contacted CHANGE to pick up a severely emaciated gelding in West Petaluma. Little did we know that this little chestnut Arabian in his mid-twenties would be among the most emaciated horses that CHANGE has encountered. 

Darla

Darla
Darla was a 36-year-old mule who was found wandering on Highway 12 in Kenwood.
By law, Animal Control authorities are required to hold loose or abandoned livestock, including horses, for 14 days. Darla’s owners eventually came forward and requested that she be euthanized. Darla’s quality of life was compromised by various age and health challenges. 

Elliot

Elliot
November 18 ,2016

Little Nova

Little Nova
Little Nova had a hard life from the beginning. She was taken in to CHANGE at only 5 weeks old, when she was found in a pasture standing next to the body of her dead mother.

Maddie

Maddie
Maddie entered CHANGE foster care in January 2011 after she was seized by Sonoma County Animal Control.
A veterinarian determined that Maddie was completely blind in one eye, and had very limited vision in the other.
Sadly, Maddie had a difficult time adjusting to foster care and her lack of vision made her dangerous at times. After a month of love and good care, Maddie was humanely euthanized.

No Name

No Name
No Name was a Quarter Horse cross gelding who was abandoned in a vineyard. He was believed to be in his late twenties. No Name showed signs of having been used in an illegal Mexican rodeo event in which horses are run loose at high speed and roped, causing them to fall violently.

Shiloh

Shiloh
Shiloh entered the CHANGE Program in 2009 with an emaciated body condition. At the time of her entry, she had lost almost half of her body mass due to starvation.

Yiyo

Yiyo
YiYo was not even lucky enough to make it into the CHANGE Program, but his story is at the heart of one of the most important felony animal cruelty trials in county history.